Log Ping Response to Log Analytics

Today I am publishing a utility called PingTimeLog.  The idea is simple; ping a group of servers and write the response time to Azure Log Analytics. This utility is intended to be run as a Runbook on an Azure Automation Hybrid Worker.  Alternatively, it will run as a scheduled task on a server in your datacenter.  The output is written to Azure Log Analytics as a custom Type, allowing users to plot response times in a time chart.

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Azure OMS Log Analytics Step by Step – Data Collector API

I see a lot of potential in Azure Log Analytics. That should go without saying considering the amount of time I have spent learning and documenting it over the past few weeks. One of the most exciting features that adds tremendous flexibility is the ability to log directly to Log Analytics with the Web API. Logging to the Web API enables anything to be written to Log Analytics without the use of the Microsoft Monitoring agent. Continue reading “Azure OMS Log Analytics Step by Step – Data Collector API”

Writing to the Windows Event Log with PowerShell

Odds are,  you were Googling something like ‘write event log PowerShell’ and you stumbled on this page.  If that’s the case and you just want to write an event to the Event Log to test something like a monitoring or alerting app, I won’t disappoint, below is what you need to know.  If you want a little more information on writing to the Event Log as part of a script, keep going.

Write-eventlog requires 4 parameters, EventID, LogName, Message and Source.  It’s the -Source part that trip people up.  If you don’t know what the source is, simply make one up.  Create the new source with the New-Eventlog command like this:

New-EventLog -LogName <Log you are writing to> -Source ‘Make one up’

For example, Adding the source HAL to the application log looks like this:

New-EventLog -LogName Application -Source ‘HAL’

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